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Product Details

Vermouth De Forcalquier

$39.95

A new, totally up-to-the-minute aperitif that is both audacious and classic.
Vermouth de Forcalquier is an aromatized wine made with absinthe and vivacious, bitter plants and spices (lemon balm, mint, mugwort, green aniseed, cinnamon, coriander and pink peppercorns)
Vermouth de Forcalquier is a full-flavoured aperitif in a superb vintage style bottle.
Vermouth de Forcalquier is truly in tune with modern trends with a touch of ‘italian style’ bitterness, but with greater richness and persistence, containing no less than 15 different botanicals.
An authentic vermouth where absinthe and cinnamon play the stars on a white wine background for a unique taste.

Our serving suggestion: Enjoy Vermouth de Forcalquier quite simply on its own on the rocks, or in a cocktail (1/3 Vermouth de Forcalquier, 2/3 tonic, and a slice of lime)
Etymology of the word Vermouth:
1798: derived from the German Wermut meaning “wormwood”, or “absinthe”.
Vermouth is a fortified wine aromatized with bitter botanicals.
Its first appearance in the dictionary was in 1798: Vermout. Wine mixed with absinthe. An aperitif that can be used as a basis for alcoholic drinks, the best known of which is vermouth cassis.
Origin: Defined in German as “a medicinal drink for imbibing preferably at breakfast” (Grimm 29, 441), it derives is name from the plant artemisia absinthium, in Old High German Weramōte, known since the beginning of the 9th century: Gröger, Kompositionsfuge, page 472). The custom of serving this type of drink as an aperitif, which appears to be the reason for borrowing the word, began in the 18th century in the Italian Piedmont: Italian Vermut subst. masc. “aperitif of white wine flavoured with herbs”. It seems probable that the French word was borrowed from an Italian Germanism. Source: http://www.cnrtl.fr
The Story of Vermouth
We owe the first of these aperitifs, or herbal wines, to Anatolian winemakers who, several thousand years ago, picked wild grapes and macerated them in hollows in the rocks with herbs that grew locally, most probably thyme, rosemary, absinthe, green aniseed etc. They transmitted their tradition to the Egyptians who recorded the process on papyrus.
Little by little each Mediterranean country invented their own recipes, starting with the skilful Etruscan winemakers, and then the Romans. So absinthe and vermouth, which have many similarities, were born many years ago, but it is only when they came to Switzerland and Germany (in the former province of Raetia) that they became known as Wermut or Vermud, which means absinthe in Old High German.
During their occupation of Raetia the Romans planted quality vineyards, and at the end of the 18th century as a mark of recognition the local winemakers conceded their rights to Wermut to the Italians, including the right to alter its name.
The nature of the climate rendered the wines more fragile, inciting the German winemakers to use large quantities of strongly perfumed herbs, and the Bavarian abbeys were making somewhat rustic Hypocras when the French already mastered the art of good wine and champagne. The original vermouths were extremely bitter because of the quantity of lemon balm, and became products recommended by doctors for their purgative and vermifuge qualities.
It was therefore thanks to the Italians that vermouth developed, and notably Carpano who established his production in Turin in 1786 using a recipe gleaned from his grandmother who had obtained it from a Bavarian monk. As a result, he became very wealthy and created a whole industry that operated on both sides of the Alps.
He followed in the footsteps of Antonio Cinzano, known as a “producer of elixirs” from 1568. In 1757 the Cinzano company set up in Turin.
The rulers of the Piedmont, the Dukes of Savoie, saw vermouth as an excellent way to line their pockets thanks to taxes, and opened distilleries around Chambery with its mediocre vineyards of white grapes.
But the birth of the veritable vermouth of Chambery is attributed to the distiller Chavasse in 1821, creating fierce competition for the vermouth of Turin for a time, until the Americans reconciled them by importing large quantities of both of their respective productions. Carpano and Chevasse soon found themselves in Manhattan to promote their bottles…
Since three quarters of the production of vermouth of Chambery was dispatched to America, it remained relatively unknown to the French public. And Italian production exploded due to the huge number of Italian immigrants on the other side of the Atlantic, where no production existed. In 1800, at Marseillan in the south of France, Joseph Noilly invented a good recipe and experienced great success with the first French dry vermouth. He teamed up with his son in law, an Englishman named Claudius Prat, in 1813. Then around 1840, Gaspare Campari and Alassandro Martini, both liqueur experts in the famous bars of Turin, founded their own establishment to make a vermouth from a family recipe.
Later, Gaspare Campari was to make a great reputation for himself in Milan with his bitters.
Lillet also became very famous in Bordeaux.

The main products used in the fabrication of vermouth, apart from white wine, are pure alcohol, white or caramelized sugar according to whether a white or a red vermouth is desired, and around 40 different aromatic plants, such as gentian, coriander, musk yarrow, grapefruit zest, hyssop, oregano, thyme, marjoram, cinnamon, cloves, balm, savory, knapweed, tea, bitter orange, sweet flag, rose, violet, lemon balm etc.

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Description

Vermouth De Forcalquier

A new, totally up-to-the-minute aperitif that is both audacious and classic.
Vermouth de Forcalquier is an aromatized wine made with absinthe and vivacious, bitter plants and spices (lemon balm, mint, mugwort, green aniseed, cinnamon, coriander and pink peppercorns)
Vermouth de Forcalquier is a full-flavoured aperitif in a superb vintage style bottle.
Vermouth de Forcalquier is truly in tune with modern trends with a touch of ‘italian style’ bitterness, but with greater richness and persistence, containing no less than 15 different botanicals.
An authentic vermouth where absinthe and cinnamon play the stars on a white wine background for a unique taste.

Our serving suggestion: Enjoy Vermouth de Forcalquier quite simply on its own on the rocks, or in a cocktail (1/3 Vermouth de Forcalquier, 2/3 tonic, and a slice of lime)
Etymology of the word Vermouth:
1798: derived from the German Wermut meaning “wormwood”, or “absinthe”.
Vermouth is a fortified wine aromatized with bitter botanicals.
Its first appearance in the dictionary was in 1798: Vermout. Wine mixed with absinthe. An aperitif that can be used as a basis for alcoholic drinks, the best known of which is vermouth cassis.
Origin: Defined in German as “a medicinal drink for imbibing preferably at breakfast” (Grimm 29, 441), it derives is name from the plant artemisia absinthium, in Old High German Weramōte, known since the beginning of the 9th century: Gröger, Kompositionsfuge, page 472). The custom of serving this type of drink as an aperitif, which appears to be the reason for borrowing the word, began in the 18th century in the Italian Piedmont: Italian Vermut subst. masc. “aperitif of white wine flavoured with herbs”. It seems probable that the French word was borrowed from an Italian Germanism. Source: http://www.cnrtl.fr
The Story of Vermouth
We owe the first of these aperitifs, or herbal wines, to Anatolian winemakers who, several thousand years ago, picked wild grapes and macerated them in hollows in the rocks with herbs that grew locally, most probably thyme, rosemary, absinthe, green aniseed etc. They transmitted their tradition to the Egyptians who recorded the process on papyrus.
Little by little each Mediterranean country invented their own recipes, starting with the skilful Etruscan winemakers, and then the Romans. So absinthe and vermouth, which have many similarities, were born many years ago, but it is only when they came to Switzerland and Germany (in the former province of Raetia) that they became known as Wermut or Vermud, which means absinthe in Old High German.
During their occupation of Raetia the Romans planted quality vineyards, and at the end of the 18th century as a mark of recognition the local winemakers conceded their rights to Wermut to the Italians, including the right to alter its name.
The nature of the climate rendered the wines more fragile, inciting the German winemakers to use large quantities of strongly perfumed herbs, and the Bavarian abbeys were making somewhat rustic Hypocras when the French already mastered the art of good wine and champagne. The original vermouths were extremely bitter because of the quantity of lemon balm, and became products recommended by doctors for their purgative and vermifuge qualities.
It was therefore thanks to the Italians that vermouth developed, and notably Carpano who established his production in Turin in 1786 using a recipe gleaned from his grandmother who had obtained it from a Bavarian monk. As a result, he became very wealthy and created a whole industry that operated on both sides of the Alps.
He followed in the footsteps of Antonio Cinzano, known as a “producer of elixirs” from 1568. In 1757 the Cinzano company set up in Turin.
The rulers of the Piedmont, the Dukes of Savoie, saw vermouth as an excellent way to line their pockets thanks to taxes, and opened distilleries around Chambery with its mediocre vineyards of white grapes.
But the birth of the veritable vermouth of Chambery is attributed to the distiller Chavasse in 1821, creating fierce competition for the vermouth of Turin for a time, until the Americans reconciled them by importing large quantities of both of their respective productions. Carpano and Chevasse soon found themselves in Manhattan to promote their bottles…
Since three quarters of the production of vermouth of Chambery was dispatched to America, it remained relatively unknown to the French public. And Italian production exploded due to the huge number of Italian immigrants on the other side of the Atlantic, where no production existed. In 1800, at Marseillan in the south of France, Joseph Noilly invented a good recipe and experienced great success with the first French dry vermouth. He teamed up with his son in law, an Englishman named Claudius Prat, in 1813. Then around 1840, Gaspare Campari and Alassandro Martini, both liqueur experts in the famous bars of Turin, founded their own establishment to make a vermouth from a family recipe.
Later, Gaspare Campari was to make a great reputation for himself in Milan with his bitters.
Lillet also became very famous in Bordeaux.

The main products used in the fabrication of vermouth, apart from white wine, are pure alcohol, white or caramelized sugar according to whether a white or a red vermouth is desired, and around 40 different aromatic plants, such as gentian, coriander, musk yarrow, grapefruit zest, hyssop, oregano, thyme, marjoram, cinnamon, cloves, balm, savory, knapweed, tea, bitter orange, sweet flag, rose, violet, lemon balm etc.

Additional information

Brands

Distilleries et Domaines de Provence

Country

France

Price

$20 – $50

Type

Vermouth

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